The number of cases of Monkeypox in the UK has grown to 57

The increase in cases is concerning, according to the UKHSA, but the risk to the general public is low. According to the UK Health Security Agency, another 36 cases of monkeypox have been discovered in England, bringing the total number of confirmed cases to 56.

The outbreak is “significant and concerning,” according to the UKHSA, but the risk to the UK population “remains low.”

The World Health Organization’s Dr. Maria Van Kerkhove calls the spread of monkeypox “manageable,” but warns that “we can’t take our eyes off the ball.”

According to UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson, the consequences “do not appear to be very serious so far, but it’s important that we keep an eye on it.”

According to the director of the EU disease control agency, countries should reconsider the availability of the smallpox vaccine, which is used to treat monkeypox.

Denmark and Scotland have reported the first cases of monkeypox outside of Africa, bringing the total number of countries reporting the disease outside of Africa to 16, including Spain, Portugal, the United States, and Australia.

Anyone in the UK who is at high risk of contracting monkeypox should stay home for 21 days.

There are three things that you should keep in mind regarding the disease:

  • Monkeypox is usually not contagious and spreads slowly from person to person.
  •  Among the symptoms are fever, aches, and a rash of raised spots that turn into blisters. Within two to four weeks, the vast majority of patients return to normalcy.
  • Monkeypox, unlike Covid, is spread through close physical contact with an infected person, and we have tools to help limit the spread, such as the smallpox vaccine. can be used to help control the spread.

Prior to the announcement of the 36 new cases in the United Kingdom, the prime minister’s official spokesman stated about travel restrictions in affected countries: “These variables do not exist. We are currently witnessing community transmission that is not related to travel.”

While vaccines were given to close contacts, he stated that no “at scale” vaccination programme was planned.

“We have significant amounts of vaccines,” he said, “but given the nature of this and how we know it’s spreading, we believe there’s no clinical need for that kind of large-scale campaign.”