Advertisment

Decoding the Structure of the Poxvirus Core: A Deep Dive into VACV Proteins and Their Role in Infection

author-image
Dr. Jessica Nelson
New Update
NULL

Decoding the Structure of the Poxvirus Core: A Deep Dive into VACV Proteins and Their Role in Infection

Advertisment

Delving into the structural aspects of the poxvirus core, a recent study has made significant strides in understanding the organization and composition of the VACV core. This research utilized advanced techniques such as cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) and subtomogram averaging (STA) to examine the structure and molecular composition of the VACV core both in vitro and in situ. The findings provide a wealth of knowledge about the palisade layer, the inner core wall, and the lateral bodies of the VACV core. Additionally, the study utilized AlphaFold2 to predict the 3D structure of the five major core proteins, A3, A4, A10, L4, and F17. The implications of these findings on the biology of poxvirus infection are profound.

Advertisment

Poxvirus Core Architecture and Composition

The study revealed that the palisade layer of the poxvirus core is chiefly composed of trimers formed by the cleavage product of VACV protein A10. The interactions within these A10 trimers are likely generalizable over members of orthopox and parapoxviruses. This understanding of the palisade layer is critical in comprehending the intricate poxvirus lifecycle. The study also provided a detailed model of the poxvirus core architecture, further emphasizing the importance of understanding the structural determinants that underlie core morphogenesis.

Structural Analysis of the VACV Core

Advertisment

The study also focused on the structural analysis of the infectious mature virus MV of vaccinia virus VACV. The core of the virus is composed of densely packed trimers of the major core protein A10, which display structural flexibility. The palisade layer on the core surface is shown to be composed of trimers of the A10 protein. The structures obtained in vitro were shown to be physiologically relevant, providing further support to the findings of the study.

Implications for Future Research and Therapeutics

The Institute of Science and Technology Austria combined various cryo electron microscopy techniques with molecular modeling to conduct this study. The findings, published in Nature Structural Molecular Biology, could greatly impact future research on therapeutics targeting the poxvirus core. The study discovered that the protein A10 is common to all clinically relevant poxviruses and acts as one of the main building blocks of the poxviral core. This knowledge could be instrumental for future research on therapeutics targeting the poxviral core. The study provides a knowledge platform for future therapeutics that seek to target poxviral cores, potentially preventing the core from assembling or disassembling and releasing the viral DNA during infection.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the research provides a detailed insight into the structure and composition of the VACV core. The understanding of the palisade layer, the inner core wall, and the lateral bodies of the VACV core, as well as the prediction of the 3D structure of the five major core proteins, could have far-reaching implications in the field of virology. This knowledge could pave the way for future therapeutics targeting the poxviral core, providing a promising avenue for the prevention and treatment of poxvirus infections.

Advertisment
Chat with Dr. Medriva !