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UN Report: Nearly Half of World’s Migratory Species Declining Due to Human Actions

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Ayanna Amadi
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UN Report: Nearly Half of World’s Migratory Species Declining Due to Human Actions

UN Report: Nearly Half of World’s Migratory Species Declining Due to Human Actions

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A groundbreaking report by the United Nations reveals a grim picture of the state of the world's migratory species. Almost half of these species are experiencing a decline in population due to a range of factors, including habitat loss, illegal hunting and fishing, pollution, and climate change. With over a fifth of the nearly 1,200 species monitored facing the threat of extinction, the report underscores the urgency of implementing effective conservation measures.

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The State of Migratory Species

The report, titled 'The State of the World’s Migratory Species', was compiled by the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS). It focuses on 1,189 animal species that are in dire need of international protection, along with an additional 3,000+ non-CMS migratory species. The findings reveal that in the past 30 years, 70 CMS-listed migratory species have become more endangered, with only 14 showing improved conservation status.

Approximately 44% of migratory animals worldwide are witnessing a decline in their population, underlining the significant impact of human activities on these species. More worryingly, more than a fifth of the species monitored by the U.N. are under threat of extinction. These figures are based on existing data, including information from the International Union for Conservation of Nature's Red List.

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Threats to Migratory Species

The primary threats faced by migratory animals are overexploitation and habitat loss. Habitat destruction, hunting, bycatch from fishing vessels, and climate change are all contributing to the declining population of these animals. For instance, the Amazon catfish, a migratory species, has been severely affected due to habitat degradation.

The report also highlights the significance of protecting vital locations for migratory animals. These locations play a crucial role in their survival and are often at risk due to unsustainable human practices. In addition, pollution, both terrestrial and marine, poses a significant threat to these species, affecting their health, reproductive capabilities, and in many cases, leading to their demise.

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The Way Forward

The U.N. report stresses the importance of immediate action to protect migratory species and their habitats. In an ongoing U.N. wildlife conference, participants are considering proposals to formally list new species of concern and protect 30% of the planet's land and water resources for conservation.

However, it's not all doom and gloom. The report also acknowledges the success of policy changes and positive actions in some areas. These measures have resulted in the improvement of the status of some species, demonstrating that dedicated and strategic conservation efforts can indeed make a difference.

The findings of this report serve as a stark reminder of the urgent need to address the decline in migratory animals. The survival of these species is crucial for maintaining the health and balance of our global ecosystems. As such, it is up to us to ensure that our actions today do not adversely impact their survival tomorrow.

Climate Change Migratory Species
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