Advertisment

Understanding the Impact of GLP1 Agonists on Liver Outcomes in Type 2 Diabetes Patients

author-image
Medriva Correspondents
New Update
NULL

Understanding the Impact of GLP1 Agonists on Liver Outcomes in Type 2 Diabetes Patients

Advertisment

The management and treatment of chronic liver disease and type 2 diabetes have been a significant concern for healthcare providers worldwide. Current research is exploring the potential impact of GLP1 agonists, a class of drugs typically used to manage type 2 diabetes, on major adverse liver outcomes (MALO) in patients with these conditions.

Advertisment

GLP1 Agonists and Their Potential Benefits

A recent nationwide Swedish study indicated that adherence to treatment with GLP1 agonists may lower the risk of MALO, including severe liver damage. This finding highlights the potential benefits of GLP1 agonists in managing liver-related complications in patients with chronic liver disease and type 2 diabetes. However, it's crucial to note that the intention-to-treat analysis did not show a clear protective effect, while the per-protocol analysis demonstrated a lower risk.

Specific GLP1 agonists, like Ozempic, have been linked to a lower likelihood of cirrhosis and liver cancer in individuals with type 2 diabetes and chronic liver disease. Those who took the drug for a long period showed a reduced risk of developing severe liver diseases. This study, funded by the Karolinska Institute, Region Stockholm, CIMED, the Swedish Research Council, and the Swedish Cancer Society, provides a promising perspective on GLP1 agonists' role in managing these conditions.

Advertisment

Comparing GLP1 Agonists with SGLT2 Inhibitors

Another study from Korea suggested that SGLT2 inhibitors, another class of drugs used to manage diabetes, might be more effective for individuals with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and type 2 diabetes. This nationwide cohort study involving 80,178 patients found that SGLT2 inhibitors were associated with a higher likelihood of NAFLD regression and lower incidence of adverse liver-related outcomes compared with other oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs).

This finding indicates that SGLT2 inhibitors might be the preferred choice among OADs for individuals with both NAFLD and T2D. However, it's essential to remember that the comparison between GLP1 agonists and SGLT2 inhibitors requires further research to confirm these findings and determine whether a shift in prescribing practices is warranted.

Advertisment

What Does The Future Hold?

While these studies provide valuable insights into potential benefits of GLP1 agonists and SGLT2 inhibitors in managing liver outcomes in type 2 diabetes patients, it's clear that more research is needed. Both studies highlight the need for larger observational studies and future phase 3 trials of GLP1 agonists to fully understand their impact on the risk of MALO.

Researchers at the Karolinska Institute plan to further investigate the effect of GLP1 agonists in a new database called HERALD, where they have access to blood samples from patients in Region Stockholm. The results from these upcoming studies could offer a more definitive understanding of GLP1 agonists' role in reducing the risk of MALO in type 2 diabetes patients with chronic liver disease.

In conclusion, the potential impact of GLP1 agonists on liver outcomes in patients with chronic liver disease and type 2 diabetes is a promising area of research. Healthcare providers and patients alike should stay informed about the latest research to make the best possible decisions about disease management and treatment.

Advertisment
Chat with Dr. Medriva !