Breast cancer disparities in Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders masked in larger ‘Asian American’ group

Studies of initial-stage breast cancer consequences often conclude that Asian Americans & Pacific Islanders fare well than non-Hispanic whites. However, the term “Asian American and Pacific Islanders” is a broad one that includes individuals with diverse ancestries, including those who are of East Asian, South Asian, Southeast Asian, and Pacific Islander heritage. When these groups’ outcomes are compared separately, it is evident that Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders (NHPIs) have significantly lower overall survival rates and longer intervals between the initial surgery and follow-up radiation—a factor that has been associated with worse outcomes in cancer treatment.

Asian Americans had a 10-year overall survival rate of 91%, according to a recent analysis by researchers at Stanford Medicine and partner institutions; NHPIs had a 10-year overall survival rate of 83%.